VIGOS Hospital

Types of Endoscopy

UGI Endoscopy

A gastroscopy is a procedure that looks inside your esophagus (Food pipe), your stomach and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum).

It’s carried out using a narrow, flexible tube called an endoscope. This has a light at the end, and a camera to allow your doctor to see images of your insides on a video monitor.    Read more...

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a narrow, flexible, telescopic camera called a colonoscope to look inside your large intestine.
It can be used to check your large bowel for signs of intestine cancer, and to investigate symptoms affecting your intestine. The procedure is performed under anaesthesia. Read More 

    

UGI Endoscopy

  • Indications

  • Preparation

  • The Procedure

  • After

  • Alternatives

  • Risks

Why a gastroscopy is used?

It can also be used to diagnose certain medical conditions or as a treatment.
Your doctor may recommend you have a gastroscopy to find out why you’re having certain symptoms. These include:

  • Indigestion (acid reflux or discomfort in your upper tummy).
  • Difficulty or pain when you swallow (dysphagia)
  • Pain in your upper abdomen (tummy)
  • Being sick (vomiting) repeatedly
  • Vomiting blood or having very dark tar-like blood in your faeces (melaena)
 In some cases, your doctor may take small samples of tissue (a biopsy) during the endoscopy

Colonoscopy

  • Indications

  • Preparation

  • The Procedure

  • After colonoscopy

  • Alternatives

  • Risks

Why do I need a colonoscopy?

Screening

You may be offered a colonoscopy as bowel cancer screening programme. Bowel cancer screening is offered to everyone over the age of 60, every two years.


Other reasons for a colonoscopy

There are several other reasons why your doctor may recommend you have a colonoscopy:

  • Investigating symptoms that could indicate bowel cancer, such as bleeding from your bottom or a change in your bowel habits
  • You have a strong family history of bowel cancer .
  • Investigating symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (for example, ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease).
  • Monitoring your bowel if you’ve previously had a polyp or cancer removed, or if you have a family history of a genetic polyp syndrome.

Your doctor can also perform a biopsy (remove a sample of tissue) or remove polyps during a colonoscopy if necessary.


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